How to serve Mezcal – Sal de Gusano

Worm Salt Orange Slices Mezcal Shot Glass

Worm Salt Orange Slices Mezcal Shot Glass

Occasionally the literal translation really does work the best. Sal de Guano gets us mostly there with “worm salt.” Sal de gusano is actually ground up salt, dried worms, and peppers.

You see it everywhere in Oaxaca. It’s sold in small bags by elderly women around the market, in huge piles within markets, and it appears everywhere in the local cuisine. It’s also an intimate part in the traditional way of drinking mezcal; you’re supposed to sit at a table with friends sharing a bottle of mezcal drunk from copitas or jicaras and, as you sip away while debating the topics of the day, dip orange or pineapple slices into a bowl of sal de gusano so that you get a blast of fruit tempered by the salty, umami flavors (sweet, sour, salty and bitter) in the sal de gusano. It’s a tremendous foil to the smooth and/or smoky flavors in mezcal.

Sal de gusano is also a perfect example of the flavor of necessity because the peppers grow right along side the agave plants while salt is and was produced on the nearby isthmus.

Grasshopper y Maguey Worm

Grasshopper y Maguey Worm

Classic Oaxacan cuisine features sal de gusano in some recipes, occasionally you’ll find it as a table top condiment, but it's especially right when drinking Mezcal.

 


Caution: It's said 'for everything there is Mezcal' but we add 'except for one thing' - getting drunk. Please drink responsibly. The most accurate and dependable book on living life at its fullest says 'wine (or Mezcal) makes the heart rejoice' and 'makes life enjoyable' (Ps 104:15; Ec 10:19) but overindulgence can certainly lead to harm (Pr 23:29-31)! If you drink at all please drink in moderation! (Quotes from NWT)